Forgot password?        
 
Requirements & Benefits

Membership in the Sinai Scholars Society offers a unique opportunity to explore your Jewish heritage, and we hope it will inspire you to continue your pursuit of Jewish education and active participation in the Jewish community. To ensure that fellows will be able to engage fully in the activities and course of study offered by the Sinai Scholars Society, we offer a stipend which will be awarded upon successful completion of the course and fulfillment of all program requirements.

Fellowship in the society continues after completion of the program, and in the coming months and years it will offer additional opportunities for members to interact with an ever-expanding network of fellow students and Jewish leaders across the country.

Because of the limited number of spaces available, we wish to ensure that those who are accepted into the program are able to make the most of the experience. The primary criteria for admission to the program are demonstration of interest in the offerings of the program and evidence of willingness to fulfill the requirements of society membership.

After you apply to the Sinai Scholars Society, you will be interviewed by the course instructor. If your application is accepted, you will be asked to attend an orientation session to introduce you to the program.

All fellows are expected to attend each of the eight two-hour classes that comprise the course.

In addition, as the course progresses, you will be expected to participate in at least three events:

  • A Shabbat dinner, at a time to be announced.
  • A mid-semester field-trip or “retreat” with your class.
  • The gala closing event in the week following the completion of the course.

In addition, Scholars are required to submit a final project as well as a reflection paper as part of the program.


Final Project

Scholars can choose one of the following four options to be qualified for the final project:

1. Course Summary

For each of the eight topics discussed, provide a brief summary of what you learned as well as its relevance to the contemporary Jewish student.

Note: The best way to go about this option is by taking notes during each lesson to use for later reference when putting together your course summary.

Criteria:

  • Each topic’s summary must be a minimum of 250 words.
  • Be sure to address the following three points in each topic’s summary:
    • Express the topic’s relevance to the contemporary Jewish student.
    • What did you personally take away from learning about this topic?
    • What is one thing you learned in this lesson that you never knew before?
  • Paper must be double-spaced, using a 12-point basic font, with one-inch margins at the top and bottom and a 1.25-inch margin on each side.
  • Pages must be numbered.


2. Course Topic Essay

Choose your favorite of the eight course topics and write an essay on it. Be sure to include a paragraph describing the relevance of the chosen topic to the life of the contemporary Jewish student.

Essays set forth the author’s point of view on a topic. Typically, essays contain fewer sources and more original thought than research papers. While authors can refer to the views of others and provide footnoted documentation to those contributors, the main point is to develop logical arguments that support the author’s point of view. Essays should demonstrate analysis of Torah sources as well as secular materials, conceptual organization, and original thought regarding the application of Torah principles in today’s world.

Criteria:
  • Minimum 2,500 words
  • Include primary and secondary sources and footnoted documentation.
  • Must be well-written, well-researched, and well-argued
  • Express your topic’s relevance to the contemporary Jewish student.
  • Follow mainstream academic writing guidelines such as MLA, Chicago, or APA.
  • Paper must be double-spaced, using a 12-point basic font, with one-inch margins at the top and bottom and a 1.25-inch margin on each side
  • Pages must be numbered.

* For a more detailed guideline and grading rubric, see the attached Research Paper Guidelines.


3. Research Paper

From the provided list of topic choices, choose one topic that you are passionate about, and explore how your idea is expressed in Judaism.

Research papers analyze questions from the perspective of a third party. They evaluate and utilize existing research performed by others to build scholarly arguments and develop new approaches. Typically, research papers fall into one of the following categories: philosophy, ethics, theology, law, or history. While these categories are broad and do overlap, they determine the subject of the paper and define its framework.

Note: This paper can be used as your proposal to join the Mentor Protege Program, which can qualify you to join our annual Sinai Scholars Academic Symposium and be published in our annual academic journal.

Criteria:
  • Minimum 2,500 words
  • Include primary and secondary sources and footnoted documentation.
  • Must be well-written, well-researched, and well-argued
  • Express your topic’s relevance to the contemporary Jewish student.
  • Follow mainstream academic writing guidelines such as MLA, Chicago, or APA.
  • Paper must be double-spaced, using a 12-point basic font, with one-inch margins at the top and bottom and a 1.25-inch margin on each side
  • Pages must be numbered.

* For the approved topic list and a more detailed guideline and grading rubric, see the attached Research Paper Topics and Guidelines.


4. Creative Arts Project

Take any one of the eight Jewish Topics discussed in the course and express the ideas you learned from it through any art medium.

Some examples of appropriate art mediums are, but not limited to, the following: photography, painting, drawing, graphic arts, architecture, and fashion design.

Criteria:
  • Submit your creative arts component.
  • Alongside your art project, submit one of two options:
    • One page summary explaining your art project and its depiction of your chosen course topic/idea
    • A short video of yourself explaining your art project and its depiction of your chosen course topic/idea

* For a more detailed guideline and grading rubric, see the attached Creative Arts Guideline.


Reflection Paper

At the end of the course, scholars must write a reflection paper describing their impressions of the Sinai Scholars experience. The reflection paper must be a minimum of one page.

Scholars are required to complete both the final project and the reflection paper in order to become a Sinai Scholar and receive a stipend.


Print this page
Print
 Email to a friend
E-mail